During my webinar “Write More, Fret Less,” a participant asked the following question: How do we write mindfully when we don’t have much time left? She was referring not to publication deadlines but to the end of her life.

Gulp.

This is probably the most important question anyone has ever asked me. I was both honored and humbled by her willingness to share something so profound. I would also be lying if I didn’t admit this question stuck in my throat for a few minutes as I tried to find a sufficient answer.

I am no guru.

As an ambitious, curious woman, time and I have been lifelong frenemies. If I could, I would do EVERYTHING. But, attempts to do everything have been futile. I end up wearing myself out, and in that worn-out state, I can get pretty crunchy. (Just ask my husband.)

So, what do you do when you’re facing the ultimate deadline?

During the webinar, I inhaled deeply, asked divine wisdom to answer for me, and offered what I’ve learned as a recovering time squanderer.

Let’s face it, whether you know the end is near, or you believe you’re immortal, our time on this planet is finite. Creating more time is not an option. What we can do is choose how we experience the time we have.

There are two choices.

Option one: view time through the lens of scarcity and focus on how there’s never enough. If you view time through this lens, time will always feel scarce. An undercurrent of fear will rule your every decision. Everything will feel rushed.

So, what’s the other option? We can view time through the lens of abundance. We can choose to believe that while we might not have all the time we wanted, we have enough time to do what’s important.

Viewing time through the lens of abundance will not magically increase your lifespan. But you will feel a sense of ease around the time you have. In that relaxed, centered space, you will use your time wisely. You will focus on what’s really important rather than trying to check everything off your to-do list.

You don’t have to be at the end of your life to practice abundant time management. All you need is a willingness to see time differently. Julia Cameron (and many others) suggest the following exercise. Write down what you would be doing if you only had six months left to live. Once you’ve finished the exercise, add as many of these things as you can to the life you’re already living.

For several years I’ve been working to practice abundant time management. Sometimes I totally ace this. At other times, old thoughts creep in. I feel edgy and hear myself say, “I don’t have time for this,” or “there’s too much to do and not enough time,” or “everything is wasting my time.”

Sound familiar?

Here’s my reframe. When I catch myself uttering these phrases, I pause, breathe deeply, and say, “oh, there’s that scarcity again.” Then I change my script. I say to myself, “I have enough time to do what’s important.”

Say that with me: I have enough time to do what’s important.

After I flip the script, I evaluate why these scarcity-based phrases are coming to mind. Maybe, I don’t have time for something I really want to do because I’m overscheduled. Maybe I’m giving too much to others and not enough to myself. Maybe, I’m struggling with what I feel I SHOULD do versus what will feed my soul.

Once I understand the root cause of my scarcity, I make a choice. I own that I’ve repeated an old pattern and explore my options. I get clear on what I want. When I need to, I say no and focus on what’s important. Each time I say no, I reframe my internal message. Instead of saying “I just don’t have time for this,” I say, “this isn’t a good fit for me. I’m choosing to spend my time in another way.”

Choice equals power, and power equals abundance.

So, what are your signals that you’re living in scarcity?

What are your antidotes to fear?

How are you making the most of your time on planet earth?

Most importantly, how does your view of time impact the way you nurture the artist within you?

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