#Giveaway4Good Week Four: Here’s Why Saying Thank Is an Essential Part of Your Creative Health

#Giveaway4Good Week Four: Here’s Why Saying Thank Is an Essential Part of Your Creative Health

During my senior year of high school, I lived with the family I’d babysat for since my freshman year. The father was an English teacher at a nearby middle school, the mother a chemical engineer. I cared for their three young children and did housework in exchange for room and board.

Three weeks before graduation, I entered my high school’s creative writing contest. The night before the contest’s deadline, the father and I reviewed my entry until almost one the morning. 

Someone else won the contest, but I was stunned by his belief in my potential. 

Eight years later, at the age of twenty-six, I finally won my first creative writing contest. Even though I’d just graduated summa cum laude, I doubted my abilities. Certain the announcement was fake, or perhaps this was just a “pity win,” I confronted my creative writing professor. 

He shook his head like my concerns were ridiculous, then said, “Of course you won. It was a great piece.” Even though I couldn’t embrace my success, he believed in my writing.
 

In 2014, I signed up for a memoir writing class during the peak of my battle with Lyme disease. I was forty and most days, my brain felt like scrambled eggs. My ideas were mushy and fragmented. I struggled to retrieve words and quickly lost my train of thought. My spelling and grammar were atrocious. Yet my instructor saw past those deficits and praised the beauty of my scene work. 

Each of these mentors taught me valuable lessons about the craft of writing, but their greatest gift was helping me believe in myself.  

If you’re reading this email, it’s likely someone has also given you this gift. 

This leads me to my final 2021 #Giveaway4Good Challenge. 

Between now and 7:00 PM EST on January 3, 2021, I’d like you to thank someone who’s impacted your writing career.  This thank you can come in the form of a letter or a short review of their book on Goodreads or Amazon.

In exchange for each thank-you letter, I’ll give you one ticket for this drawing. 

Earn 3 tickets for each book review.

Review the Best of Brevity, The Story Cure, or Getting to the Truth: The Craft and Practice of Creative Nonfiction and I’ll give you 4 tickets

This week’s prize is a one-hour coaching session with me. We can talk about your current work in progress, an upcoming project, or any aspect of your writing life.

You’ll also be entered into my grand prize drawing for a one-year membership to James River Writers, a 3-pack of webinars from The Crow Collective Online Writing Workshops, one Jane Friedman webinar of your choice, a 10-page manuscript review plus one-hour coaching session with me, and a query letter review by Allison K Williams.

To enter this week’s drawing, send me an email. Include the name of the person or organization you’re thanking and one sentence about how they’ve impacted your writing journey. If you wrote a brief review for Amazon and Goodreads, simply send me a screenshot of your review.

Saying thank you isn’t just something nice to do. Expressing gratitude for those who’ve helped you, improves your mental health and wellbeing and deepens your connections with others. It creates a sense of openness within you that can serve your creativity and sustain you as you take risks in your writing life.

Last year I was deeply touched by the emails I received from writers who had expressed their gratitude to mentors and the authors who’d encouraged them not to give up. For many of these writers, crafting these letters benefitted them too.

To launch this challenge, let me start by thanking you. Thank you for trusting me with your time and attention during an age of overflowing inboxes and information overload. Thank you for your kind and generous emails about posts you find meaningful and the writing challenges you’ve faced. Thank you for sharing your tips and tricks with all of us. Your wisdom is a gift to this writing community. Most importantly, thank you for showing up to your writing desk and having faith that your story matters. You’re amazing, and I’m deeply, deeply grateful to you.

So, who are you going to thank? 

Your message might be the greatest gift this person receives over the holiday season. 

I look forward to hearing about your choices between now and the drawing deadline on January 3, 2022. 

Giveaway4Good Week Three: Why Supporting Independent Bookstores Is an Investment in Your Writing Career

Giveaway4Good Week Three: Why Supporting Independent Bookstores Is an Investment in Your Writing Career

OMG, you won’t believe how inspired I was by that reading on Amazon.

Remember that question I had about my manuscript? I met someone on Amazon who had the perfect solution to my story’s problem. We’re forming a writing group.

Amazon is hosting my launch party. Want to attend? 

These are just a few things said by no writer ever

I know, Amazon is cheap, convenient, and, well, getting packages in the mail is a little like year-round Christmas. Plus, after two years of pandemic living, receiving those boxes with a little smile has become the norm.

While Amazon might be a necessary part of your publishing career, this retail giant only cares about one thingyour sales numbers. 

Fortunately, both bibliophiles and writers make the above comments about their local independent bookstores. 

Independent bookstore owners and their staff champion their local writing communities by designing programs that bring creative people together. 

They give debut and established authors places to host readings and do book signings. 

We’ve talked about this before, but it deserves repeating. Supporting independent bookstores is an investment in your writing career. Building relationships with independent bookstore owners increases the odds they’ll say yes to your event request when your book is published. Or if you decide to self-publish like Ashleigh Renard, that relationship could result in your books being featured on local bookstore shelves.

If publication feels like a far-fetched dream, think about the authors you care about. Supporting local independent bookstores ensures they have venues for book signings and readings. 

At these readings and signings, you’ll have the opportunity to develop connections with authors and learn what happened behind the scenes when they were drafting their stories. This can deepen your understanding of their work and your own process. 

Independent bookstores are so critical to writers’ careers that book influencer and host of the Moms Don’t Have Time to Read Books podcast, Zibby Owens, has created a #22in22 Challenge that encourages readers to visit local bookstores 22 times in 2022, as she says, “In person. Like, with your body.” 

Participating in this week’s challenge can give you a head start.

Here’s what you need to do: 

  1. Buy something at an independent bookstore (ten-dollar minimum) and I’ll give you one ticket for this week’s drawing. You can buy anything from a book to a gift card. 
  2. Buy from a Black-owned bookstore and I’ll give you three tickets for this week’s drawing. 

 
Completed your independent bookstore shopping in the past two weeks? No problem. Send me a screenshot of your receipt and I’ll enter you into this week’s challenge.

 Later this week, I’m going to send you an entire post on the importance of Black-owned bookstores, but for now, I want to share a quote from DeShanta Hairston at Books and Crannies, a Black-owned bookstore in Martinsville, VA. 

“Books and Crannies offers a community space for writers to engage and share a love for the craft. As a black-owned bookstore, we make efforts to upsell Black authors and book titles to help readers gain perspective of our stories and livelihood. My belief is that reading about Black culture helps bridge the gap to the understanding of blackness as a whole.” 

Black-owned bookstores provide a valuable service to all of us by lifting up voices that aren’t always heard.

Many people donated to Black-owned businesses in 2020 in response to the death of George Floyd and the countless Black men and women killed at the hands of police. This led to record profits for some Black-owned businesses. While that’s great, it’s important to continue to support these businesses so they can continue to thrive.

Maybe you’re thinking, but Lisa, I love shopping online, and between Omicron and the recent uptick in COVID cases, I’m sticking close to home.

Did you know you can order on the web or call in your order to most bookstores? Many deliver or offer curbside pickup. They’d love to receive your web order or call. 

Or maybe you don’t know the name of the independent bookstore in your area. 

Here are a few links to help get you started: 

 
This week’s prize is a $30 gift card to New Dominion BookshopPLUS one copy of Seven Drafts: Self-Edit Like a Pro from Blank Page to BookThe War of ArtGetting to the Truth: The Craft and Practice of Creative NonfictionDoodling for WritersThe Best of BrevityThe Business of Being a Writer, and a signed copy of My Monticello by Jocelyn Johnson.

You’ll also be entered in my grand prize drawing for a one-year membership to James River Writers, a 3-pack of webinars from The Crow Collective Online Writing Workshops, one Jane Friedman webinar of your choice, a 10-page manuscript review plus one-hour coaching session with me, and a query letter review by Allison K Williams.

Generously donate $100 or more and you’ll get access to a mindful writing class scheduled for early 2022 and a chance to win a storytelling coaching session with Amy Eaton.

If you’re struggling financially, or you’re looking for a second way to play, I’ve got a literary-citizenship option for you. 

  1. Share events or information about your favorite independent bookstore on social media and I’ll give you one ticket for this week’s drawing. 

 
To enter this week’s drawing, here’s what you need to do: 

  1. If you’re supporting an independent bookstore, send me an email with the name of the bookstore and the amount of your purchase. Please include a screenshot of your receipt or online order. If you were able to pick your purchase up locally, send me a picture of the item for a photo collage I’ll create for my week four newsletter. 
  2. If you’re sharing independent bookstore information on social mediasend me a screenshot. 

 
Have a question? Send me an email.

The deadline for this week’s challenge is Monday, December 20, 2021, at 7:00 EST.

Thank you in advance for your literary citizenship! 

#Giveaway4Good Week 2: Four Self-Serving Reasons to Join James River Writers

#Giveaway4Good Week 2: Four Self-Serving Reasons to Join James River Writers

James River Writers is a nonprofit writing organization located in Richmond, Virginia, about one hour from Charlottesville. They host a monthly Writing Show, master classes, social gatherings, and an annual multi-genre conference. Their programs focus not just on the craft of writing, but on the important writing topics we need to consider, like their recent panel discussion on censorship and book banning.  Of all the conferences I attend, this one’s closest to home.  

 

One of my first agent pitches happened at the 2016 James River Writer’s Conference. This session was a free perk offered to all conference attendees—a rarity in the writing world. If you’re working on a book, I highly recommend these pitch sessions!

 

Let me set the stage for my pitch session. 

 

It was 11:00 A.M. on a Saturday morning. I’d had three too many cups of coffee and worried that I was on the brink of a deodorant malfunction. Five other writers waited in line with me. The woman in front was pitching a historical romance. Neither one of us had done this before. During our ten-minute wait, we whispered our pitches to each other then said good luck as we were ushered to our respective tables. 

After our whirlwind meeting, we hugged in the middle of the hotel lobby, celebrating our pitching victories. Both agents had requested our manuscripts.

 

During that morning’s opening event, Executive Director Katharine Herndon had said, “Welcome to your tribe.”

It’s hard to create that vibe when the literary interests of your audience are so diverse. But somehow Katharine and her team pulled it off. If she hadn’t, there’s no way two introverted strangers would’ve shared that long mid-conference hug. 

 

Last year, I served as one of the 2020 James River Writers Conference presenters and witnessed Katharine’s staff transition their annual conference to an online format. Not only was the transfer seamless, but the conference meet-and-greet opportunities maintained that same sense of connection I’d felt at past events. I attended this year’s conference as well, and again their execution was flawless.

 

Over the past two years, I’ve encouraged clients and students from across the country to attend. After the 2020 conference was over, one wrote to me and said attending the 2020 James River Writers Conference made her feel like a real writer. It gave her the courage to keep working on her writing goals. 

 

She’d claimed her space as a writer just like I had at the 2015 Creative Nonfiction Conference

 

Perhaps you live far from Richmond, and you’re wondering why you should support this organization. I’ll give you four self-serving reasons.  

  1. Agent pitch sessions will help you get clear on your project. Pitch well, and the agent will give you their email address and request a submission. That connection means they’re more likely to open your email and thoughtfully consider your work.  
  2. If one of your dreams is to publish a book, making connections at literary organizations well in advance of your book launch is essential. Signing up for the JRW newsletter or a membership will help you better understand what they do and how you can be of service. 
  3. It takes a village to raise a writer. While a homegrown writing community is essential, it’s also important to branch out. Perhaps you want to be on a conference panel or would like to find an author who can serve as a launch partner. Someone in a distant city might be just what you’re looking for. 
  4. Since many of their events are currently online, and it’s free to sign up for their newsletter, you have absolutely nothing to lose.

But you have lots to gain by supporting them, including tickets for this week’s drawing for a $30 gift card to New Dominion BookshopPLUS one copy of Seven Drafts: Self-Edit Like a Pro from Blank Page to BookThe War of ArtGetting to the Truth: The Craft and Practice of Creative NonfictionDoodling for WritersThe Best of BrevityThe Business of Being a Writer, and a signed copy of My Monticello by Jocelyn Johnson.

 

You’ll also be entered in my grand prize drawing for a one-year membership to James River Writers, a 3-pack of webinars from The Crow Collective Online Writing Workshops, one Jane Friedman webinar of your choice, a 10-page manuscript review plus one-hour coaching session with me, and a query letter review by Allison K Williams.

 

Generously donate $100 or more and you’ll get access to a mindful writing class scheduled for early 2022 and a chance to win a storytelling coaching session with Amy Eaton.

 

Not bad, for doing something that could serve you so well. 

 

Financial donations and memberships to James river writers, hippocampus literary magazine, and brevity, are worth 3 tickets into this week’s drawing.

 

To make a donation to James River Writers, click here

 

To sign up for a membership, click here. 

 

Other ways you can earn tickets by supporting James River Writers:

  • Following them on Facebook and Twitter,
  • Subscribe to their  e-newsletter
  • When you see them sharing their programs and the accomplishments of their writing family through their communications, you can then turn around and share them with your sphere of influence, helping us all reach a wider audience. 

 

 To enter this week’s drawing, send me an email.

Please include the amount of your donation or a screenshot of your donation or social media support.

To learn more about the challenge or how supporting BrevityHippocampus Literary Magazine, or any other literary nonprofit can help you score tickets for this challenge, click here

The deadline for this week’s drawing is Monday December 13 2021 at 7:00 PM EST.

 

Thank you in advance for your literary citizenship. 

 

#Giveaway4Good Week 2: Why Supporting Organizations Like Hippocampus Benefits You

#Giveaway4Good Week 2: Why Supporting Organizations Like Hippocampus Benefits You

By the time I learned Mary Karr was the keynote for the 2016 HippoCamp conference I was out of travel funds. Over the next few months, online friends raved about the event. So, I registered as soon as the 2017 conference opened for registration. 

 

While I waited, I read their online magazine and marveled at how their essays exemplified the beauty that happens when heart, craft, and truth intersect.

 

In August of 2017, I drove to Lancaster, PA with a fellow student from a Memoir in a Year class. On Friday afternoon, we walked into the Marriott ballroom feeling like outsiders, but by Sunday it was as if we’d spent the weekend with old friends. 

 

As an introvert, the phrase meet-and-greet sends chills up my spine. I attend these social gatherings because they’re essential networking activities, but the feeling I most associate with them is awkward. 

 

I’m not sure whether the potato martini bar or Amish-country vibe set the tone for HippoCamp’s Friday night meet-and-greet, but I know it was my entry into the HippoCamp family.

 

It didn’t matter if you’d just written your first word, or you were the keynote speaker. Everyone was treated like an equal.

 

Since 2017, I’ve attended four HippoCamps. At each one, my creative family has grown. I’ve joyfully watched clients build new connections and strengthen their identities as writers.

 

But it wasn’t until the 2021 HippoCamp Conference that I really understood how essential these events are. So much of our writing lives are spent alone or engaging with other writers online. We are truly blessed to live in a world where other writers are only a click away. But magical things happen when writers gather in person. Spontaneous conversations, collaborations, and riffing occurs. The air fills with creative energy and excitement. It’s a place where new ideas and breakthroughs are born.

 

As I listened to conference breakout sessions, my mind whirred with new ideas, different approaches for my projects, and innovative ways to work with my clients. I left revved up and ready to write.

 

I would be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge the angst that comes with attending a conference during a pandemic. Most of us had been holed up in our houses for all of 2020. I and many of my friends had to take more breaks than usual because we hadn’t spent this much time with other people, and well, Delta.

 

Donna Talarico and her team worked diligently to make this a safe, welcoming, and successful conference. I can only imagine the additional hard work she put into organizing this conference and the sacrifices required to ensure its success during a pandemic.

 

Just before leaving the conference, I took socially distant pictures with several friends and risked a few masked hugs, each time saying the same thing: See you next year.

 

We can ensure conferences like HippoCamp are here for years to come by supporting their organizations with our financial gifts. For just $10, you can do that AND win fabulous prizes.

 

Before I started my business, I worked at a nonprofit writing center. I know what happens on the back end. Paying registration fees or subscribing to magazines can give the false impression that conferences are huge moneymakers but breaking even is the actual goal. Organizers know this, and they’re happy with this outcome because they care so deeply about our writing community. The precarious nature of breaking even is the very reason why they need our support.

 

If you’ve attended HippoCamp and you love what they do, I hope you’ll support them, knowing that I’m supporting you by offering opportunities to win books, coaching sessions, and so much more in exchange for your generous donations.

 

If you’ve already joined this week’s campaign, thank you!

 

If you haven’t had a chance, here are a few quick reminders:

 

Make a ten-dollar donation to Hippocampus Literary Magazine and you’ll earn three tickets toward this week’s drawing for a $30 gift card to New Dominion BookshopPLUS one copy of Seven Drafts: Self-Edit Like a Pro from Blank Page to BookThe War of ArtGetting to the Truth: The Craft and Practice of Creative NonfictionDoodling for WritersThe Best of BrevityThe Business of Being a Writer, and a signed copy of My Monticello by Jocelyn Johnson.

 

You’ll also be entered into my grand-prize drawing for a one-year membership to James River Writers, a 3-pack of webinars from The Crow Collective Online Writing Workshops, one Jane Friedman webinar of your choice, a 10-page manuscript review plus one-hour coaching session with me, and a query letter review by Allison K Williams.

Generously donate $100 or more and you’ll get access to a mindful writing class scheduled for early 2022 and a chance to win a storytelling coaching session with Amy Eaton.

Unable to give financially?

 

You can earn one ticket into this week’s drawing and the grand-prize drawing by:

  • Signing up for their newsletter
  • Reading a Hippocampus Magazine story or article, commenting on it, and sharing it with followers on at least one platform.
  • Suggesting a Books by Hippocampus book to a local library, indie bookstore, or to a friend/family member as a holiday gift idea. 
  • Adding a Books by Hippocampus book to the “to-read” section of your Goodreads account. If you’ve read one of their books, write a review for both Amazon AND Goodreads. 

To support Hippocampus Literary Magazine, click here

 

 To enter this week’s drawing, send me an email.

 

Please include the amount of your donation or a screenshot of your donation or social media support. 

Remember, the deadline for entry into this week’s drawing is Monday, December 13, 2021 at 7:00 PM EST. 

 

To learn more about the challenge or how supporting, BrevityJames River Writers, the Crow Collective, or any other literary nonprofit can help you score tickets for this challenge, click here

 

Thank you in advance for your literary citizenship. 

 

#Giveaway4Good Week Two: Why supporting literary organizations is an investment in your writing life, and how doing so can help you win prizes.

#Giveaway4Good Week Two: Why supporting literary organizations is an investment in your writing life, and how doing so can help you win prizes.

When I was a special education teacher, it often felt like there were never enough resources, money, or love for the children I served. Sometimes that sense of not enough was so big I wondered if I should even try.

Only in retrospect can I see the difference I made. Sometimes that’s still true.

Last week, we raised $7317.25 for charitable organizations!

This week, the focus is on our literary community. 

Here’s your challenge:

Make a $10 donation to any literary organization and you’ll earn one ticket into this week’s drawing for: 

In case you’re wondering, yes, it’s the same prize package as last week’s drawing. That’s because these books are so essential.  

You’ll also be entered into my grand prize drawing for a one-year membership to James River Writers, a 3-pack of webinars from The Crow Collective Online Writing Workshops, one Jane Friedman webinar of your choice, a 10-page manuscript review plus one-hour coaching session with me, and a query letter review by Allison K Williams.

More donations equals more tickets.

You can earn three tickets for $10 donations to Hippocampus Literary MagazineBrevity, or James River Writers. You can also earn three tickets for buying a copy of The Best of Brevity or purchasing a class through the Crow Collective Online Writing Workshops.

To enter, all you need to do is email me screenshots of your donations. That’s it.

If you haven’t heard of the Crow Collective, you must check them out. This Canadian-based writing organization is run by the blue-haired story maven, Sage Tyrtle. I’ve had the pleasure of writing with Sage and experiencing her expert facilitation. I also personally know several of her instructors. Your life will be changed by working with them. Plus, the courses are incredibly affordable, which makes this a win-win.

Here’s why your donations matter: 

Most writing organizations are volunteer-run passion projects funded just above the bottom line. Sometimes those funds come directly from the people who run them. This is especially true when an organization is in its infancy or we’re experiencing, say, a pandemic. 

Many have had to reinvent themselves to deal with COVID. Yet even while navigating ginormous pivots, these organizations have shared their knowledge and inspiration through online classes, webinars, conferences, and blog posts. They’ve read and published our stories, hosted online readings, and organized free events—all while struggling with the same COVID-related crud and setbacks experienced by the rest of us. 

Maybe you’re wondering why you should give to a writing organization when there’s so much else going on both in your life and in the world. Ask yourself where you’d be without them.

Who would publish your writing? 
Who would organize the conferences that allow you to speak with literary agents or meet your next writing BFF?  
Where would you connect with or expand your network?
Who would teach you how to become a better writer?

Ten dollars is the equivalent of three Starbucks lattes or one Chipotle burrito bowl (at least in the USA).

If five people became Friends of Hippocampus at the $3 per month level (or fifteen of us donated $10), we could fund a $150 travel stipend for a HippoCamp Literary Conference scholarship winner. If twelve of us became Friends of Hippocampus  (or forty of us made $10 donations), we could cover contributor honorariums for one bi-monthly issue of Hippocampus Literary Magazine. 

If fifteen people donate just $10 to James River Writers, we could sponsor a student scholarship for its nationally recognized annual conference. If twenty-five people did this, we could subsidize a scholarship for an adult writer in need. In 2021, thanks to generous donors, seventy-five writers who wouldn’t normally be able to make the conference were able to attend.

If twenty people donate to Brevity or buy a copy of the Best of Brevity, we could support honorariums for their authors and the expansion of their teaching resources.

Writers who generously donate $100 or more will be entered into an exclusive drawing for a storytelling coaching session with Amy Eaton. These donors will also get access to a free mindful writing course with me. This is in addition to the other prizes I’m offering.

 

Low on funds? 

You can still support these organizations by subscribing to their newsletters, following them on social media, and sharing two social media posts about a current offering, a recent essay or story they’ve published, or why you love them so much. Send me email proof via screenshots, and you’ll earn one ticket into this week’s drawing.

The deadline for this campaign is Monday, December 13th at 7:00 PM Eastern Standard Time.

I now know that every effort counts, even if we don’t see an immediate difference. Thank you in advance for supporting our beloved writing community. Doing so is a commitment to your writing life and a demonstration of the love we have for each other.

 

As you consider what is yours to do, write on and be sure to send me an email with your donation information.

 

 

#Giveaway4Good Week One: Support Charitable Organizations and Win Prizes Every Writer Will Love

#Giveaway4Good Week One: Support Charitable Organizations and Win Prizes Every Writer Will Love

Last year, I started my #Giveaway4Good campaign with little more than faith. Faith in my cheerleading. Faith in this writing community. And faith in our capacity for collective good.

I wanted to see what would happen if we worked together to create some extra light during a time of deep heartache and loss. So, I sent a few emails to my favorite writing organizations and asked for their support. Then I turned it over to you and envisioned our success. Happily, that faith paid off. 

Together, we raised over $24,000 for charitable and literary organizations. You supported local independent bookstores. I gave away prizes. We had some fun, even while muscling through the disappointments of our very little Christmases.

It’s once again Giving Tuesday. The pandemic has thrown us yet another curveball as we head into the holiday season. (Thanks, Omicron!)  Instead, of letting that dim our lights, let’s have some more fun and support our communities one more time.

During each weekly #Giveaway4Good challenge, I’ll ask you to give away some of your time, talent, or treasure. 
Answer my call and you’ll be entered into my weekly drawing for valuable writing-related goodies you won’t want to miss. 

Everyone who enters a weekly drawing will also be entered into a grand-prize drawing designed to support every aspect of your writing life. Don’t believe me?

Check this out: 
 
Grand-prize package: A one-year membership to James River Writers, a 3-pack of webinars from The Crow Collective Online Writing Workshops, one Jane Friedman webinar of your choice, a 10-page manuscript review plus one-hour coaching session with me, and a query letter review by Allison K. Williams.

Holy giveaways, am I right?
 
Here’s this week’s challenge: 

Make a donation to any charity that supports families in need, and you’ll receive one ticket for this week’s drawing. 

Make donations to two different organizations and you’ll receive two tickets for this week’s drawing. 

Make three donations and receive three tickets. 

All tickets will be eligible for the grand-prize drawing.
 
The minimum donation is $10.00; however, I will reward those of you who donate $100 or more with extra tickets and access to a fabulous secret prize drawing. 
 
This week’s prize: $30 gift certificate to New Dominion Bookshop PLUS one copy each of Seven Drafts: Self-Edit Like a Pro from Blank Page to BookThe War of ArtGetting to the Truth: The Craft and Practice of Creative NonfictionDoodling for WritersThe Best of Brevity (or The Story Cure), The Business of Being a Writer, and a signed copy of My Monticello by Jocelyn Johnson.

And yes, you will receive all these books, which makes this over a $150 value! 

Jocelyn Johnson’s breakout short story collection My Monticello has been featured on NPR’s 360 Books to Read and the New York Times. Netflix plans to adapt it into a movie. She’s a hometown hero who has been both my neighbor and yoga buddy. You’ll learn more about Jocelyn during an upcoming interview.
 
New Dominion is the oldest independent bookstore in Charlottesville, Virginia. They are a huge supporter of the Charlottesville writing community AND they can deliver anywhere in the United States.
 
If you read my interview with Ashleigh Renard, you know how important supporting your local independent bookstore is to your writing career. 
 
Here’s an added bonus: Make a donation to one of the charities listed below and I’ll give you three tickets for this week’s drawing. (And yes, you can get three additional tickets for each donation you make). 

What do you need to do to receive your ticket? 

    Sign up for my newsletter and then send me an email with a screen shot of your donation. All I need to see is the name of the charity and the amount, nothing else. (The minimum donation to qualify for the drawing is $10). That’s it.
     
    Are you struggling financially

    This giveaway is for everyone, regardless of your circumstances. Send me an email with pictures capturing three random acts of kindness you’ve completed and I’ll enter you in this week’s drawing and the grand-prize drawing. 

    Also (and this goes for everyone), recommend my newsletter to your followers and you can also get an extra ticket for my drawings. Just email me a screenshot of your post

    I’ll draw the first winner on Monday, December 6, 2021, at 7:00 PM EST. Consider this your deadline. The winner will be announced in my December 7th newsletter.

    Because I want us to do the greatest amount of good for our community, I’ll be sending reminders over the next few days. Feel free to delete them if your inbox is overburdened. I won’t be offended.

    If you’re a person who likes to think ahead, here’s a brief overview of the challenges to come.

    • Week two (12/712/13): Earn tickets by donating $10 to your favorite literary organization.
    • Week three (12/1412/20): Earn tickets by purchasing books or gift certificates at an independent bookstore. Bonus tickets will be awarded for books purchased through black-owned bookstores
    • Week four (12/2012/27): Earn tickets by writing reviews on Amazon and Goodreads for your favorite authors and earn a ticket toward one free coaching session with me

    If you’d love to support my #Giveaway4Good but you’re not interested in the prizes. you can send me an email letting me know about your donations and I’ll add them to our totals.

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